Puma

The cougar (Puma concolor) is a large felid of the subfamily Felinae. It is native to the Americas. [1]  Its range spans from the Canadian Yukon to the southern Andes in South America, and is the widest of any large wild terrestrial mammal in the Western Hemisphere. It is an adaptable, generalist species, occurring in most American habitat types. [3]  Due to its wide range, it has many names including puma, mountain lion, red tiger, and catamount is the second-heaviest cat in the New World after the jaguar. Secretive and largely solitary by nature, the cougar is properly considered both nocturnal and crepuscular, although daytime sightings do occur.

They are the fourth-largest cat species worldwide; [32]  adults stand about 60 to 90 cm (24 to 35 in) tall at the shoulders. [33]  Adult males are around 2.4 m (7.9 ft) long from nose to tail tip, and females average 2.05 m (6.7 ft), with overall ranges between 1.50 to 2.75 m (4.9 to 9.0 ft) nose to tail suggested for the species in general. [34][35]  Of this length, the tail typically accounts for 63 to 95 cm (25 to 37 in). [36]  Males generally weigh 53 to 100 kg (117 to 220 lb), averaging 68 kg (150 lb). Females typically weigh between 29 and 64 kg (64 and 141 lb), averaging 55 kg (121 lb). [37][36][38][39]  Cougar size is smallest close to the equator and larger towards the poles. [3]  The largest recorded cougar, shot in 1901, weighed 105.2 kg (232 lb); claims of 125.2 kg (276 lb) and 118 kg (260 lb).